[anti]Stasis

Charcoal, Oil Paint on Canvas. 60 x 96 Inches. 2012.

The figure’s inversion symbolizes his transition into a dreamlike, catatonic state or stasis. In one instance, he is in a peaceful, muted, hypnotic paralysis, simultaneously asleep and awake, neither dead nor alive—in between several different forms of realities and existences. In another instance, he is far from a paused state, and rather, is in constant physical and spiritual motion. The beautiful and terrifying amorphous, anti-temporal space in-between these different realities is characterized by the shoaling fish; their own instinctual, trance-like state and resulting collective behavior in the shoal (many bodies moving as one force, like a flock of birds, or a swarm of insects), within the expanse of the dreamscape, mirror the main subject’s time-space confusion. For us (the viewers) the shoal of fish is also our own point of departure from our present reality into an alternate, spiraling space of hypnosis, deep sleep, and dreaming.

[anti]Stasis

Charcoal, Oil Paint on Canvas. 60 x 96 Inches. 2012.

The figure’s inversion symbolizes his transition into a dreamlike, catatonic state or stasis. In one instance, he is in a peaceful, muted, hypnotic paralysis, simultaneously asleep and awake, neither dead nor alive—in between several different forms of realities and existences.

In another instance, he is far from a paused state, and rather, is in constant physical and spiritual motion. The beautiful and terrifying amorphous, anti-temporal space in-between these different realities is characterized by the shoaling fish; their own instinctual, trance-like state and resulting collective behavior in the shoal (many bodies moving as one force, like a flock of birds, or a swarm of insects), within the expanse of the dreamscape, mirror the main subject’s time-space confusion. For us (the viewers) the shoal of fish is also our own point of departure from our present reality into an alternate, spiraling space of hypnosis, deep sleep, and dreaming.