Syringe Girl

charcoal, graphite, india ink on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

This work is one of the earlier drawings that I developed for the series. With intersecting figures that are now overcome by large blots of black ink, I wanted to deal with the messiness and realities of drug experimentation among young black girls. In this case, the “trip” or the “high” is something in which we partake as the viewers; we try to focus on the main subject’s face, but are unable to do so with ease—we experience a blurring of forms. Here, the notion of self-destruction, as with some of the other drawings in this series, is highlighted as something in which the larger society is complicit. This drawing addresses the reality that young black girls who stumble into a world of self-destruction are actually victims who need rescuing—a consideration that is often denied black girls who find themselves in self-destructive trouble, especially in the contexts of drug abuse and prostitution.

 

In the case of Syringe Girl, the use of the musical score both as a way of defining this particular troubled character, and as a way of flattening the figure – making her a design, once again. The score is titled Dey Stole My Child Away, composed by “-“

 

 

 

Syringe Girl

charcoal, graphite, india ink on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

This work is one of the earlier drawings that I developed for the series. With intersecting figures that are now overcome by large blots of black ink, I wanted to deal with the messiness and realities of drug experimentation among young black girls. In this case, the “trip” or the “high” is something in which we partake as the viewers; we try to focus on the main subject’s face, but are unable to do so with ease—we experience a blurring of forms. Here, the notion of self-destruction, as with some of the other drawings in this series, is highlighted as something in which the larger society is complicit. This drawing addresses the reality that young black girls who stumble into a world of self-destruction are actually victims who need rescuing—a consideration that is often denied black girls who find themselves in self-destructive trouble, especially in the contexts of drug abuse and prostitution.

In the case of Syringe Girl, the use of the musical score both as a way of defining this particular troubled character, and as a way of flattening the figure – making her a design, once again. The score is titled Dey Stole My Child Away, composed by “-“

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